Burial or cremation?

The decision to bury or cremate is a very personal one, often influenced by costs and the practices of a person’s culture or religion.

Burials

A burial is the process of placing the deceased person in a coffin and then into the ground (a grave) and covering it over with soil. Deceased people can be buried either in a lawn section of a cemetery (where a small plaque or monument may be erected at the head of the grave) or in a monumental section (where a monument completely covers the grave). Burials are much more expensive than cremations

Cremation

Cremation is the reduction of a body to ashes by fire conducted in a purpose-built crematorium. One of the advantages of cremation is that it is less expensive than burial, saving you a lot of money. Cremation also does not take up land space and for this reason many people consider cremation more environmentally-friendly. Cremation offers families a range of opportunities to commemorate the deceased in an appropriate manner following the actual cremation — such as scattering the ashes in a place with special significance.

Which is more popular – burial or cremation?

The number of people in Australia choosing to be cremated is steadily increasing. Whilst there is some variance between states and territories, cremations now generally outnumber burials. Cremation funerals are much more common in city areas where crematory facilities are available. Burials predominate in rural and remote regions.

If you decide to bury, look at your options and compare prices between cemeteries.

In some cultures, entombment in a mausoleum is the preferred resting place for the deceased. The mausoleum is constructed above ground and allows the coffin to be placed in a crypt which is then sealed. A mausoleum is a unique type of interment, with a courtyard-style area being beautifully finished in granite and marble.

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